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That's history: The roots of common law in Canada

This third column on the roots of Canada’s legal traditions is devoted to the common law, following others on indigenous law and civil law.
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Editorial: Close community

The Ontario legal community is incredibly inter-connected.
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Speaker's Corner: Canadian insight on U.S. executive order

All eyes are on the U.S. court system after an executive order by U.S. President Donald Trump barred citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for 90 days. It stopped refugee processing for 120 days and put a complete halt on Syrian refugee processing. There was no guidance on dual citizens or U.S. permanent residents, which caused concern and confusion at the borders.
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Editorial: Human lawyers, rejoice

Law Times has features this week exploring legal innovation.
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Speaker's Corner: Restorative justice in response to hate

Many Canadians expressed a deep sense of sorrow and outrage after a man shot worshippers in a mosque in Quebec City on Jan. 29. The shootings — soon after U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning nationals from seven countries from entering the United States for 90 days — touched a collective nerve in Canada. Thousands of people attended vigils across Canada, in response to the deaths, and social media was alive with commentary about combatting Islamophobia.
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Editorial: Privacy reigns

Law Times reports this week that an Ontario Superior Court judge determined a rule was breached when two Toronto lawyers exchanged private records about a sexual assault complainant with no notice to a court, the woman or her counsel.
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Speaker's Corner: Time to end shareholder primacy

As lawyers, we are all acutely aware of the fact that changes to the law are a given. Society changes, technology changes and governments change. Meanwhile, the law needs to keep up.

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Editorial: What a debt

The non-profit corporation has hit headlines for all the wrong reasons, most notably a $26-million deficit in 2016.
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A Criminal Mind: What’s in store for the Supreme Court?

For those of us who intently watch the Supreme Court of Canada, 2016 was not a banner year for criminal law. (That is, with one big exception.)
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Editorial: Vacancies, again

A proactive cabinet shuffle may be a smart move, but some burrs remain in the side of the federal government. The Canadian Bar Association kicked off 2017 by calling on Federal Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada Jody Wilson-Raybould to accelerate the hiring of judges, classifying the issue as “an acute access to justice problem.”
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  • Access to Justice
    Access to Justice The Action Group on Access to Justice (TAG) strives to inform the public on the importance of the people having access to legal resources and…
  • Legal Aid lawyers rally for collective bargaining rights
    Legal Aid lawyers rally for collective bargaining rights Legal Aid Ontario lawyers held three protests in July to push the provincial government to support their attempts to unionize. The lawyers have been in…
  • Jane-Finch community gets employment law help
    Jane-Finch community gets employment law help Osgoode Hall Law School's Community Legal Aid Services Programme recently opened an employment law division for Toronto's Jane-Finch community.Phanath Im, review counsel for the division,…
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Law Times poll

After the Supreme Court set out a framework to assess the independence of expert witnesses, litigators have different opinions about whether it’s too difficult to exclude expert evidence on the basis of bias. What do you think?
Yes, it remains very hard to get this evidence excluded, but this may change as trial court judges pay more attention to the backgrounds of expert witnesses.
No, it is not hard to get this evidence excluded, as the courts continually refine the role of experts in both criminal and civil litigation.