Focus On


  • Debate over birthright citizenship emerges
    Jamie Liew says there is currently no legal bar to birth tourism in Canada, and she strongly opposes any amendment that would tackle it by ending birthright citizenship.

    Debate over birthright citizenship emerges

    Eliminating birthright citizenship would be an overreaction to fears about a growth in birth tourism, according to an Ottawa immigration law professor.

  • Additional changes for employment laws proposed
    Lucas Mapplebeck says changes to overtime and averaging agreements in Ontario are ‘very relevant.’

    Additional changes for employment laws proposed

    Ontario’s employment and labour laws could undergo more changes in 2019. On Dec. 6, the government introduced Bill 66, Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act.

  • Employee misclassification remains key concern
    Tassia Poynter says she believes the first class action lawsuit alleging employee misclassification in the factual television industry has emerged.

    Employee misclassification remains key concern

    Ontario courts could once again be asked to rule on whether workers are “employees” or “independent contractors,” a proposed lawsuit says.

  • Company followed standards in mass termination
    Timothy Pinos says a recent Ontario Court of Appeal decision re-affirms employers’ requirements under the ESA.

    Company followed standards in mass termination

    A recent Court of Appeal decision gives rare guidance about how to apply the Employment Standard Act’s rules about mass termination, employment lawyers say.

  • Family status accommodation at centre of case
    Lorenzo Lisi says a recent Ontario Superior Court decision ‘highlights the importance of the contextual analysis with respect to the request for accommodation.’

    Family status accommodation at centre of case

    A recent Ontario Superior Court decision shows the courts are still grappling with how best to determine what classifies as workplace discrimination on the basis of family status, say lawyers who represent employers and employees.

  • Changes to act mean work for lawyers
    Rodrigue Escayola says changes to the provincial Condominium Act are, for the most part, an improvement.

    Changes to act mean work for lawyers

    Significant legislative changes governing Ontario’s condominium industry which began rolling out more than a year ago have created a greater degree of fairness, say condo lawyers.

  • Tribunal still dealing with records cases only
    Deborah Howden says a recent Condominium Authority Tribunal decision ‘confirms that privacy and confidentiality of the [condominium] voting process is still protected under the legislation.’

    Tribunal still dealing with records cases only

    Ontario’s new Condominium Authority Tribunal has proven its usefulness in just over a year of existence in its limited capacity to deal with disputes over records, say lawyers.

  • Electronic voting could help with governance
    Denise Lash says condo boards will have better governance thanks to legislative changes in Ontario that now allow for electronic voting by members.

    Electronic voting could help with governance

    A newly acquired ability to introduce electronic voting to condominium meetings may ease the burden of achieving quorum at meetings and help in the governance of these communities, say lawyers.

  • No word when second phase of changes coming
    We haven’t really gotten any clear guidance from [the government] on when these things are going to arrive.

    No word when second phase of changes coming

    Lawyers are bracing for another wave of amendments to the Ontario Condominium Act, but there are questions about when they’ll be enacted and if the change in provincial government will alter the course of the previously laid plans.

  • SCC decision liked by lenders
    Alan Kenigsberg says a Federal Court of Appeal ruling in 2017, that was later reversed, was ‘contrary to the way most secured creditors and bankruptcy lawyers believed things worked.’

    SCC decision liked by lenders

    In a decision widely welcomed by lenders, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the bankruptcy of a tax debtor, although subsequent to the repayment of the secured creditor’s debt, terminated secured creditors’ personal liability for deemed trust claims under s. 222 of the Excise Tax Act.

cover image

DIGITAL EDITION

Subscribers get early and easy access to Law Times.

Law Times Poll


The Law Society of Ontario is in the midst of a major overhaul of the role of paralegals in family law — and a proposal on the issue could become an imminent issue for the regulator’s newly elected benchers. Do you agree with widening the scope of family law matters that paralegals can address?
RESULTS ❯