Focus On


  • Retailers and producers work out structure of storefronts
    Mark Asfar says the province’s goal was to support small business and oppose vertical integration of the cannabis market, where the producers would also be the retailers.

    Retailers and producers work out structure of storefronts

    With the rollout of private retail cannabis stores in Ontario, the province put restrictions in place to ensure that licensed producers can only maintain a 9.9-per-cent stake in those retail outlets.

  • Condo boards shifting rules after legalization
    Warren Kleiner says condo boards can prohibit smoking, growing or processing cannabis within the building.

    Condo boards shifting rules after legalization

    Lawyers say some Ontario condominiums have been looking to change their rules to restrict cannabis. They say there are options for legally prohibiting cannabis in buildings, such as grandfathering rules to existing residents or owners if those guidelines to prohibit smoking were not in place before the Oct. 17, 2018 legalization date.

  • Technology in cars accelerating, with privacy pondered
    Robert Love says there are often advantages for the consumer to share information with manufacturers gathered through the use of their vehicle.

    Technology in cars accelerating, with privacy pondered

    Technological development in vehicles that are becoming increasingly connected to the digital world is outpacing the laws developed to protect the privacy of consumers, say lawyers.

  • Facial recognition technology raises concerns
    Jordan Donich says widespread use of facial recognition technology may allow the physical tracking of people.

    Facial recognition technology raises concerns

    Toronto criminal defence lawyer Jordan Donich says he has concerns about the possible uses of facial recognition technology.

  • Open banking explored in Canada
    Ronak Shah says open banking is a new paradigm in the financial services sector with a focus on consumer data portability.

    Open banking explored in Canada

    Privacy and security considerations loom large as Canada explores the open banking concept that has already been adopted by the European Union and the United Kingdom, say lawyers.

  • Privacy protection at issue in pot purchases
    Chantal Bernier says those who want to purchase cannabis within the privacy of their own home by buying marijuana online will leave a digital trail, but there are privacy protections in place.

    Privacy protection at issue in pot purchases

    Protecting the identity and financial information of those who purchase marijuana is one of the primary concerns of the nascent retail market for recently legal marijuana, say lawyers.

  • Chronic pain is not a minor injury, tribunal says
    Sylvia Guirguis says injured people already face hurdles to accessing the treatment they need.

    Chronic pain is not a minor injury, tribunal says

    The Licence Appeal Tribunal of Ontario has ruled that chronic pain should not be considered a minor injury under the Minor Injury Guidelines.

  • Joint and several liability review announced
    Peter Cronyn says he thinks a review of joint and several liability is not needed.

    Joint and several liability review announced

    Some personal injury lawyers are concerned after Ontario Premier Doug Ford announced recently that the government is considering reviewing joint and several liability.

  • Inadmissible evidence could lead to new trial
    Stephen Ross says ‘expert evidence is supposed to assist in letting the trier of fact understand a complicated issue.’

    Inadmissible evidence could lead to new trial

    The Ontario Court of Appeal has ordered a new trial in a sexual assault case, after ruling a participant expert’s testimony at the trial was inadmissible.

  • Tougher legislation needed to stop distracted driving
    Patrick Brown says distracted driving can be hard to stop because often drivers aren’t caught and the cases can be hard to prosecute.

    Tougher legislation needed to stop distracted driving

    Increased penalties aren’t enough to stop people from using their cellphones when driving, say personal injury lawyers. New penalties for distracted driving came into force in Ontario on Jan. 1.

Law Times Poll


A legal battle over audio and video recordings of court proceedings may be headed to the Supreme Court of Canada. Do you think Ontario courts should allow audio and video recordings of court proceedings in Ontario to be released by parties involved in the matter?
RESULTS ❯