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This Week's Issue

‘Widespread barriers’ for racialized licensees

Alex Robinson - Monday, September 26, 2016

A long-awaited report on the barriers racialized lawyers and paralegals face has recommended the Law Society of Upper Canada lead by example in snuffing out systemic racism in the legal workplace.
In addition to recommending a number of new requirements for licensees, the report recommends that the law society conducts its own internal diversity assessment of its governing body and provide equality and inclusion education to Convocation on a regular basis.

The report says information gathered by the committee shows “widespread barriers experienced by racialized licensees within the legal professions at all stages of their careers,” with some participants noting that they believed “racialized licensees were more li...


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Recent decision raps Crown for third time

A decision by the Ontario Court of Appeal ordering a new trial on drugs and weapons charges is the third time in the past three years that a court has made critical findings about the conduct of a Brampton-based Crown attorney.

Supporters speak out in favour of LPP

Proponents of the Law Practice Program are reeling from a Law Society of Upper Canada report that recommends ending the alternative to articling.

Editorial: Tackling racism

I once heard an expert compare racism in Canada to punching a marhsmallow. The point was that racism in Canada is not hard-edged but soft and hard to grab, as well as tricky to pin down. It’s stuck with me for more than a decade. A report by a Law Society of Upper Canada committee on challenges faced by racialized licensees speaks definitive truth to power.

Speaker's Corner: Why the LPP should stay

As the legal profession continues to evolve and adapt to changing needs and as we search for highly qualified, diverse talent to add to the profession, the Law Practice Program provides employers like myself with a window into the future of legal training.

Focus: Where IP intersects with competition law

The Competition Bureau’s first major update to its Intellectual Property Enforcement Guidelines in a generation marks a good opportunity for IP lawyers to reacquaint themselves with their competition law colleagues, according to one leader in the field.

Decision reaffirms buyer beware rule

A recent Superior Court decision dismissing a claim brought by a homebuyer against the previous owners over mould found in the property’s basement reaffirms the doctrine of caveat emptor, lawyers say.

Jordan highlighted at courts opening ceremony

Chief Justice George Strathy says the province’s justice sector needs “substantial investment” in order to bring it into the 21st century.

Editorial: The bench speaks

Judges are often loath to speak to reporters. 

Speaker's Corner: The reality of wind power contracts

Rural landowners who are approached to permit a wind turbine or turbines or associated equipment on their acreage badly need sophisticated legal advice on these complex agreements. 

Focus: Does privacy law trump competition law?

All eyes in the competition bar are on a pending Federal Court of Appeal hearing that is setting up a showdown between Canada’s Competition Act and federal privacy legislation, known as PIPEDA, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act.

Inside Story

Monday, September 26, 2016

DIMOCK STRATTON MERGES WITH DLA PIPER (CANADA)
DLA Piper (Canada) LLP and Dimock Stratton LLP have combined forces.

Starting Nov. 1, lawyers from the intellectual property firm will join DLA Piper’s Toronto office.

“It’s exciting, an exciting opportunity,” says Bruce Stratton, a partner at Dimock Stratton LLP, who will also be a partner in the new merger.

 “The legal market is changing and becoming more of a global market, and for intellectual property, the global aspect is key and we see this as a way of connecting into an incredible global network,” Stratton added.

The Canadian arm of DLA Piper — which has six offices across the country — joined with DLA Piper, which spans more than 30 countries, in April last year.

Roger Meltzer, global co-chairman and co-chairman (Americas) of DLA Piper, hailed the merger with Stratton.

 “This key market continues to generate a wealth of new opportunities, and with intellectual property and technology law standing at...

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Law Times poll

A LSUC report on racialized licensees recommends measures like the LSUC doing an internal diversity assessment, and providing equality and inclusion education to Convocation. Do you plan to read the report, and support its recommendations?
Yes, this report is a critical piece of insight on how to address the widespread barriers that racialized licensees face. These recommendations, if implemented, can lead to important social change.
No, I do not have plans to read this report. This issue is very complex and needs more than the LSUC recommendations implemented to lead to meaningful social change.